July 28, 2012 Obara Meji 12Comment

He who gives a person Obi gives a person life

Obi Abata, or Kola Nut is used by all who practices the Ifa/Orisa Tradition, as a divining tool.

Kola nut itself can be found all over Africa, It is even grown in my own country Jamaica where we call it BISI

In Jamaica it is used as a tea, where it is grated, dried and bottled and used to remove poison out of  the system or for any allergic reaction, It is said that Kola is only grown where people respect their elders.

Divination plays a crucial role in the ancient Yoruba traditional religion of Ifa Orisa. It is through casting the Oracle that non-initiates and priests alike can determine the wishes of their Ori, the Ancestors and the Orisa. One may also determine whether the prayers and offerings presented tothe divine forces are both heard and accepted. Finally, casting the Oracle allows the devotee to have a direct communication with the forces they serve, opening a way for a one-on-one dialogue with divinity.

It is the birthright of everyone to have direct communication with ones Ori and ones Ancestors.Everyone has Ancestors by virtue of birth and all things in existence have an Ori, even the Orisathemselves. While it is a generally accepted belief in the various branches of the Orisa tradition that one should receive Orisa before consulting them with the Oracle, one need not rituallyreceive the Ase of the Ancestors or Ori before engaging in such a consultation. Their Ase alreadyruns strong through your veins and resonates deep within the cells of your body.However, one must be trained on how to properly cast the Oracle in order to perform even themost basic divination. This training involves far more than mechanics and touches upon issuesranging from applied logic during the cast process to the limitations of both the person casting theOracle and the Oracle it self.

It is not the intention of this basic module to provide such detailed training. This module has beenpresented to provide the student with the basic mechanics necessary to determine simple yes/no answers to basic questions, mainly to determine the necessity of making an offering to ones Oriand Ancestors and subsequently to determine whether the offering has been accepted.

IMPORTANT NOTE: One should never divine for another person without being both properlytrained and duly granted permission to do so by ones Elders in the religion. Divining for others isoften a case of having someones life in your hands and one must be properly prepared on many levels to accept this enormous responsibility. The information presented in this module is entirely inadequate to negate or replace the need for appropriate training by ones Elders and should only be used to consult with ones Ori and ones Ancestors on your own behalf.

Students should consult their elders in the religion for more detailed training. Additionally, the student may also find more detailed information in both Awo: Ifa and the Theology of OrisaDivination by Awo Falokun Fatunmbi and Awo Obi: Obi Divination in Theory and Practice by BabaOsundiya.Serious students are strongly encouraged to take their study further using available resources and to understand that this module represents the first step of a long journey.

I was too lazy today to write upon the titled subject, so I found this very well explained peice on the internet and decided to share….

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12 Comments on "OBI ABATA….KOLA NUT!!!"

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[…] it while being given to the divinity it was prescribed for. When the sacrifice is given, the OracleObi Kola is cast before the divinity to see if the sacrifice is accepted, according to what it states as […]

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[…] This Is what is known as Bisi in Jamaica Obi, Kola nut in Africa, and it is used for poisoning among other things. There is  a post here on this blog dedicated to Obi Kola Nut. […]

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[…] would have washed at least two obi kola nut and have cool water (omi tutu) already prepared down and a bottle of gin as we approach […]

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[…] it while being given to the divinity it was prescribed for. When the sacrifice is given, the Oracle Obi Kola is cast before the divinity to see if the sacrifice is accepted, according to what it states as […]

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[…] shouted ‘Ase’ and I was told to also say Ase which I did. My god mother broke  Obi Kola nut, which we know in Jamaica as Bisi, (but the nut form), Kola is used as an oracle within our […]

theafricanentrepreneur
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I just came across your blog today when I was trying to read about my Jamaican brethren.I am a Ghanaian, an Ashanti to be precise and its amazing me the things am reading over here,especially about the maroons of JA. And yeah,bisi is a twi word for cola nut.And cola nut is regarded as very special even in traditions and customs.It cures a lot of diseases and very good when eaten regularly. In Yorubaland, is even involved during marriage ceremonies. There is a type called bitter cola (you can try that if you get) which is very medicinal.

Kudos to your blog,its very educative. And I like the story I read about Nana (Nanny), Kwadwo (Kojo,Cudjoe), Akyeampong (Accompong). Its great to know Ashantis/Akans have always been warriors back in their traditional home and even when the sad event of slavery happened.

Nanny reminds me of Yaa Asantewaa of the Ashanti’s (you can look her up if you don’t know about her).A woman warrior who led her kingdom against the british.This makes me cherish our Ashanti women (black women) more of the strength they posses (I see it in my grandmother and mother).I just wish black women the world over will educate themselves of these histories and know they have been queens since time immemorial and act as such.

Slim XS
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First off I would like to say superb blog! I had a quick question
which I’d like to ask if you do not mind. I was curious to find out how you center yourself and clear your mind before writing. I’ve had a hard time clearing my thoughts in
getting my thoughts out. I truly do enjoy writing
but it just seems like the first 10 to 15 minutes are generally lost simply just trying to figure out how
to begin. Any recommendations or hints? Thank you!

Maniac
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Maniac

Very good indeed…..It nuh taste so nice doa, but ee gud

Maniac
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Maniac

The good old bisi. I have seen my father use this for as long as I can remember.
The kitchen drawer is never out of some grated and dried bisi (It has to be grated before drying or else it would be like trying to cut through a rock…is this true Obara?)
Whenever any of the dogs got sick (poisoned I was told), he would boil some, allow it to cool and force it down that dog’s throat. By morning it was as good as new again. Worked everytime!!!

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