September 26, 2014 Obara Meji 167Comment

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This Thursday October 2nd 2014 in our book club discussion Lalibela Nile has provided us with the material. He will be the one to moderate on the topic. The link for subject is posted below, I believe Lalibela will also write a supporting essay which I will post along with it, I hope I am correct and he did say so, if not whatever is below will suffice. We thank MTh, for her contribution to Book Club night which is something which I look forward to every Thursday night and I thank you all for the support

We thank Yw for a job well done last night, we had a wonderful discussion on a very daunting subject,  I am sure others who were here would agree, but a subject which needed attention due its growth in recent years, also Lalibela shared with us that the country Guyana had a very high suicide rate, Wow!. We appreciate you Yw, for an excellent job well done, we had a great time, Again thank you all for showing up, although some were missing, but the interaction was outstanding, kudos to you all. Knowledge is Key and so we push forward to the next, please be on time as we aim to begin @ 8 pm.

PUNISHMENT OR CHILD ABUSE?

 

 

WASHINGTON — THE indictment last week of the N.F.L. player Adrian Peterson by a Texas grand jury for reckless or negligent injury to a child has set into relief the harmful disciplinary practices of some black families. Mr. Peterson used a “switch,” a slim, leafless tree branch, to beat his 4-year-old son, raising welts on the youngster’s legs, buttocks and scrotum. This is child abuse dressed up as acceptable punishment.

While 70 percent of Americans approve of corporal punishment, black Americans have a distinct history with the subject. Beating children has been a depressingly familiar habit in black families since our arrival in the New World. As the black psychiatrists William H. Grier and Price M. Cobbs wrote in “Black Rage,” their 1968 examination of psychological black life: “Beating in child-rearing actually has its psychological roots in slavery and even yet black parents will feel that, just as they have suffered beatings as children, so it is right that their children be so treated.”

The lash of the plantation overseer fell heavily on children to whip them into fear of white authority. Terror in the field often gave way to parents beating black children in the shack, or at times in the presence of the slave owner in forced cooperation to break a rebellious child’s spirit. Black parents beat their children to keep them from misbehaving in the eyes of whites who had the power to send black youth to their deaths for the slightest offense. Today, many black parents fear that a loose tongue or flash of temper could get their child killed by a trigger-happy cop. They would rather beat their offspring than bury them.

If beating children began, paradoxically, as a violent preventive of even greater violence, it was enthusiastically embraced in black culture, especially when God was recruited. As an ordained Baptist minister with a doctorate in religion, I have heard all sorts of religious excuses for whippings.

And I have borne the physical and psychic scars of beatings myself. I can’t forget the feeling, as a 16-year-old, of my body being lifted from the floor in my father’s muscular grip as he cocked back his fist to hammer me until my mother’s cry called him off. I loved my father, but his aggressive brand of reproof left in me a trail of un-cried tears.

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RELATED IN OPINION

  • Charles M. Blow

    Op-Ed Columnist: On Spanking and AbuseSEPT. 17, 2014

Like many biblical literalists, lots of black believers are fond of quoting Scriptures to justify corporal punishment, particularly the verse in Proverbs 13:24 that says, “He who spares the rod hates his son, but he who loves him is careful to discipline him.” But in Hebrew, the word translated as “rod” is the same word used in Psalms 23:4, “thy rod and thy staff, they comfort me.” The shepherd’s rod was used to guide the sheep, not to beat them.

Many believers — including Mr. Peterson, a vocal Christian — have confused the correction of children’s behavior with corporal punishment. The word “discipline” comes from the Latin “discipuli,” which means student or disciple, suggesting a teacher-pupil relationship. Punishment comes from the Greek word “poine” and its Latin derivative “poena,” which mean revenge, and form the root words of pain, penalty and penitentiary.

The point of discipline is to transmit values to children. The purpose of punishment is to coerce compliance and secure control, and failing that, to inflict pain as a form of revenge, a realm the Bible says belongs to God alone.

Yet secular black culture thrives on colorful stories of punishment that are passed along as myths of ancient wisdom — a type of moral glue that holds together varying communities in black life across time and circumstance. Black comedians cut their teeth on dramatically recalling “whoopings” with belts, switches, extension cords, hairbrushes or whatever implement was at hand. Even as genial a comic as Bill Cosby offered a riff in his legendary 1983 routine that left no doubt about the deadly threat of black punishment. “My father established our relationship when I was 7 years old,” Mr. Cosby joked. “He looked at me and says, ‘You know, I brought you in this world, I’ll take you out. And it don’t make no difference to me, cause I’ll make another one look just like you.’ ”

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The humor is blunted when we recall that Marvin Gaye’s life ended violently in 1984 at the hands of his father, a minister who brutalized him mercilessly as a child before shooting him to death in a chilling echo of Mr. Cosby’s words.

Perhaps comedians make us laugh to keep us from crying, but no humor can mask the suffering that studies say our children endure when they are beaten: feelings of sadness and worthlessness, difficulties sleeping, suicidal thoughts, bouts of anxiety, outbursts of aggression, diminished concentration, intense dislike of authority, frayed relations with peers, and negative high-risk behavior.

Equally tragic is that those who are beaten become beaters too. And many black folks are reluctant to seek therapy for their troubles because they may be seen as spiritually or mentally weak. The pathology of beatings festers in the psychic wounds of black people that often go untreated in silence.

Adrian Peterson’s brutal behavior toward his 4-year-old son is, in truth, the violent amplification of the belief of many blacks that beatings made them better people, a sad and bleak justification for the continuation of the practice in younger generations. After Mr. Peterson’s indictment, the comedian D. L. Hughley tweeted: “A fathers belt hurts a lot less then a cops bullet!”

He is right, of course, but only in a forensic, not a moral or psychological sense. What hurts far less than either is the loving correction of our children’s misbehavior so they become healthy adults who speak against violence wherever they find it — in the barrel of a policeman’s gun, the fist of a lover or the switch of a misguided parent.

Michael Eric Dyson, a professor of sociology at Georgetown, is writing a book on President Obama and race.

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Ty
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Mi mother stamma….lol

http://youtu.be/dH4m7AVQjLk

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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Sweet dreams NuNu

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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I will be right back…

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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Imagine this, “Jamaican doctors say they won’t be attending to patients with Ebola because they are not equipped to do so
“We don’t have any money in Jamaica, but if it comes, I don’t know how many of us are going to be willing to come to work. We in ICU are not going to deal with it. I’m not going to expose my doctors and nurses to that,” he continued. “So Accident and Emergency will have to decide what they are going to do with the first one (case).”
“But where will we quarantine them? We don’t even have the equipment,” said another doctor. “[Health Minister] Fenton Ferguson won’t be here to buy them (gear) when Ebola comes here. We are going to hear that he is not on the island,” she added, to snickers from the gathering.
http://jamaica-star.com/thestar/20141002/ent/ent1.html Story…”

MTH
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Guys I am here reading the comments.

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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Bayard Rustin might be is role model/inspiration…

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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Lawrence O’Donnell is praising Blow’s effort–he regard his book as a literary masterpiece… The NY Times–Blow’s employer–compares Blow’s book to Langston Hughes’ first book…

Ty
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He has gotten rave reviews on twitter

The excerpts I read were good

MTH
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Typed an episode and lost it. Tablet not fixed,

In regards to beating, I was beaten as lot by my mom, I have searched my mind to find a period in time when she loved me and I can’t find such a time. I was TERRIFIED of having my mom washing my hair and how she would grab my hair and dragged all about.

I used to spank Big M as a child but learn early that she would actually listen when I spoke to her, by the time I had Little M I knew how to be a loving parent and I havent had much reason to slap/spank her.

Ty
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Courtney, Yazzy, Nyaha, Cogh, Amh, Cas, New Name ….we miss you…

Ty
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Charles, 19 …unno join in… We want to hear from you…

Ty
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I am off to bed Niles… I enjoyed this one… These topics are important for us to review, reflect, and discuss

Night Obara, Cami, Nunu, Toy, Mth, Kiab, peeper, and all massive and crew

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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Blow is correct or should I say that I agree with him–relative to the following:

“Use of corporal punishment is linked to negative outcomes for children (e.g., delinquency, antisocial behavior, psychological problems, and alcohol and drug abuse), and may be indicative of ineffective parenting. Research also finds that the number of problem behaviors observed in adolescence is related to the amount of spanking a child receives. The greater the age of the child, the stronger the relationship…”

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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Parent need to know that my stance has nothing to do with me castigating them–most parents are defensive when it comes to corporal punishment and would mostly refute the notion that their choice of punishment is more of a reflection of them more than anything.

MTH
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Reading and catching up.

Ty
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Hey Pardy…

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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I remember as a youth, I decided that I was no longer going to cry or run when I was getting my butt whipped and once I did that, the whipping stopped. My protest blew my aunt’s mind–she was so bothered by my rebellious stance and conceded that she was wasting her time beating me…

toy7318
Blogger

Did you your aunt beat you for a reason?

Ty
Blogger

Luckily your aunt had a conscience….

I had a aunt who would beat my cousin…I loved this cousin and so I would hold on to my aunt, cry and pull down her clothes…it worked, she did not beat her while I was there…I was a child at the time and my cousin and I are the same age,..

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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I don’t think the blog is flowing correctly…

Cami
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Cami

I knew the thoughts that ran through my head when I was run off to my room and I can remember the amount of times I wanted to strike the matches and bun dung the house but because I knew I would get a assing before the fire trucks roll in I didn’t…Is not every children you can handle with “kid” gloves.

I’m off to do something should be back in 45 mins.

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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Cami, see if this answer your question–relative to African punishment in pre-slavery days:

“There’s a tribe in Africa that has a very beautiful custom. When one of the members makes a mistake, the entire tribe surrounds him/her and for two days, they speak of the great things that member has done. It is their belief that humans are good at heart and that we all seek security, love, peace and happiness. However, in this pursuit, we sometimes make mistakes and when that happens, the tribe unites to reconnect that member with his/her real nature. This tribe’s greeting is SAWUBONA, or I value you, I respect you, you are important to me. And the reply is SIKHONA or so I exist for you.”

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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Though I agree with the author, how do we explain the use of corporal punishment that is administered within groups over generations, that were never subjected to slavey in the manner that we’v been subjected?

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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When we use violence, we are telling our children that violence is the ultimate answer and as long as they believe that, they will always their respective fist to solve their problems…

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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I believe that reasoning and non-physical punishment is always the answer. Relative to balance, where is the balance? Corporal punishment is seemingly the most expedient way to punish a child; however, it is the most destructive of the means…

Cami
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Cami

I’m bearing witness to two boys who were free as birds in their homes…one just got releasr from a boys camp and the other diagnose as being psychotic, both 17 years old. The were spoiled and unruly. They never do any wrong for their parents….so how do you prevent this misfortune from happening. They are heading to somebody prison or worst.

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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Cami, not beating a child is not synonymous with not punishing a child. Based on what you’ve outlined, those children were spoiled and that is tantamount to a child becoming deviant/subversive…

Ty
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Some a dem last days Pinckney ya …whew…to to to

NuNu
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NuNu

My brother hated school and it affected his school work because of what he experienced by the hand of our principal. He was a very active kid so he’d love to play etc. at school but the punishment far exceeded the ‘crime’ he’d have to kneel on D&G bottle stoppers etc. Once the Teacher stuffed bun and cheese down his throat( if I’m not mistaken it was from the trash) and he threw up. To this day you can’t bring bun and cheese near him

toy7318
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Nile, Nunu said that her brother’s teacher stuffed food down his throat

NuNu
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NuNu

Yes Toy and Nile those are the things I don’t agree with, that abuse was not helping a ‘stubborn’ child. That happened over 20 years ago and he still speaks about it to this day. So parts of what Nile says I agree with wholeheartedly

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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That was such a traumatic experience…

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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NuNu, they traumatized the poor child…

toy7318
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What! Oh no that is wrong.

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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Toy7318, what’s wrong?

Ty
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These adults are sick…

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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I don’t support corporal punishment at all. Yes, most if not all of have been on the receiving end of physical punishment and I am here to tell you that corporal punishment is a function of administering fear and sowing the seeds of violence. With advance knowledge, we have to appeal to our greater intellect better understanding of harms that are associated with physical punishment. I agree with Ty, the administering of corporal punishment is more of a reflection of the parents as opposed to the deviation of the child.

If we were to buy into what Dr. Dyson has outlined, slave parents whipped their children in an effort to keep them inline and to show unison with the slave master as the slave master often times whipped slaves to keep them inline—fearing the white man’s wrath as it relates to rebellious young slaves. We then used biblical references to justify the whipping of our children—not realizing that we were breeding violence into our children. It’s simple, violence bigot violence—in one manifestation or other.

Parenting—proper parenting—is very tedious and time consuming. Normally, it is our of rage and anger why we beat our children. Seldom does a calm and measured parent beat his or her child/children. Beating a child speaks more to the disposition of the parent(s) more than it does the child/children. We should always reprimand/discipline a disobedient child; however, we should never resort to corporal punishment. Take away a child’s phone, TV/computer/tablet privileges, no hanging out with friends, cancel a birthday party, et al. However, first and foremost, we must communicate with our children—reason with them and show them the errors of their ways and point to potential outcomes that are associated with a particular deviation.

Cami
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Cami

So how do Africans (including before slavery) disciplined their children?

toy7318
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Great point Nile

NuNu
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NuNu

And if taking away all those don’t work then what? I have an aunt who is trying to discipline without corporal punishment but if everything else doesn’t work then what? As I said I don’t believe in brutalizing but a slap or two can still be effective without some type of ‘damage’

toy7318
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Right Nunu

Ty
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Well said Nile

NuNu
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NuNu

I agree with the the article Dr. Dyson wrote, I see some beatings and it really looks like some slavery times disciplining using brutality and fear but in the long run I can’t imagine the psychological damage as a result

Ty
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The beating to a pulp is abuse, not ever warranted…

Raising black kids in the us is hard…like DL Hughley says a father beating is less painful than a cops bullet…

NuNu
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NuNu

Mi not even did see your comment Ty before mi write mine. I so agree with that statement you just made.

toy7318
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My friend beat her son so bad gave him a black eye. Everytime she would raise her hand to get something the little boy would jump he was so frightened.

Cami
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Cami

A fight she a fight de child…that a no beating.

NuNu
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NuNu

As the writer said better a beating than a police bullet. Black kids/ men especially rarely get second chances. But I think you can teach without brutalizing a child. Even before stealing, acting up outside etc. I don’t like kids that talk back to there parents! Nope too many ‘modern’parents let that slide

Ty
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True Nunu…

Also the use of love, kind words, hugs, kisses are much more useful tools to get in line….

Positive reinforcement is really a gem…

Ty
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Lawd God, that sound bad…

kiabubblez
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kiabubblez

Yes i believe in corporal punishment when needed. However i think is a very thin line betwn corporal punishment n child abuse. Parents have to careful not to spank while angry and know when to stop. Ive used switches such as adrian peterson maybe used for his son. They can sting n leave welps. So u have to careful.

toy7318
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I don’t beat my kids a lot. I try not to put my hands on especially my son because he is a tiny little thing and I know what my temper is like, but after I do hit my kids. I ask them if they know I slapped them and make them explain to me why they were hit, because I feel they should understand the reason behind the spanking, because I don’t want to keep hitting them for the same thing

kiabubblez
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kiabubblez

I agree Toy. They must understand why they in trouble n get spank. So as not to repeat the offense

Ty
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Any conversations with your children about your expectations, hopes, dreams…are always good…

Ty
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When I was going to kindergarden…my mom told the teacher whatever it trek if get it in her thick head please do…just spare di eye dem…

After hearing that I was well behaved the whole year…

NuNu
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NuNu

Yes a boy’s mother in my fourth grade class told the teacher the same thing Ty!

NuNu
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NuNu

My aunt got kidney damage from a school beating. I think parents back in the day especially were way too harsh, they’d beat for anything and everything

toy7318
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Yes I agree with Corporal punishment. If it is needed

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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When is it ever needed?

Cami
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Cami

It’s need when you know your kid is hard of hearing and will violate rules outside the home that will put them in the white man jail house..,which is the same for poor whites who don’t want their kids in said jail house.

Ty
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Needed for stealing, behaving bad in public, doing something that can land both of u in jail…

Cami
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Cami

1) Yes, I support corporal punishment. It’s a matter of checks and balances.

For instances, Daddy spanked me for telling a bare face lie as a child and what that produced was me not embracing the habit of lying for simple reasons and it also taught me to respect what isn’t given to me.

The writers premise of corporal punishment in African American families is similar to a video put up last week regarding a comment about violence and Slavery, which I wasn’t in agreement with,

kiabubblez
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kiabubblez

Greetings everyone good night

toy7318
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Hey Kia

kiabubblez
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kiabubblez

Howdy Toy

NuNu
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NuNu

Evening Kia

kiabubblez
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kiabubblez

Yailings Nunu

NuNu
Blogger
NuNu

I got beaten twice when I was younger fi stubborn and twice at school once in the 5th grade and by 2 teachers at the same time in the 6th ( that one mi bawl from 8am in the morning till mi guh home 4pm) Obedience is my thing so I avoided getting whooped. I don’t agree with using anything besides the hand to spank a child, and by spanking I mean maybe 3 or 4 swats. My brother always says if a child has to be defending themselves then it’s abuse.

Cami
Blogger
Cami

I slapped my nephew (9) once and when he began to cry i felt absolutely disgusting and it broke my heart that he cried. I apologized a few times and told him I’ll never do it again. I threaten them (4 of them 11-3) with beatings and yell a lot (they think I’m crazy which helps). The slap in the face is a hell No it’s demeaning I learnt that the most miserable way.

When I threaten to beat them they echo what I say and run to their areas and laugh at me, but when I threaten to turn off T.Vs, take IPads and no pepper pig they know I’m serious.

Cami
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Cami

They think “auntie crazy” so if I threaten them they listen for a while. I’ll kinda tap them on the shoulder if I must and then they’ll say “Stop auntie, don’t do that”…these little people I’m expose to aren’t “normal” (lol).

Ty
Blogger

Lol

Ty
Blogger

I love peppy pig…lol

A slap or two to the palm or rump only in extreme cases…no box or face or head hits should ever be used…

Once you hit them, then u can use just the threat of another slap as a tool

Ty
Blogger

I agree wid a few slaps with the hand when warranted, it should not be a practice…

Ty
Blogger

I have gotten those beating to pulp already too…

I have a scar in my back from where my mom threw a high heel shoe at me..

My mom was depressed and frustrated and took it out on me…

I have slapped my sons already…when dem like toy seh push me…very few times and all we’re warranted…

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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Hitting a child should play a number on any humane parent. If a parent were to say that they are not bothered by whipping a child, I would have to question the sanity/humanity such a parent…

NuNu
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NuNu

Yes my aunt beat her son once and it broke her down completely, the drame day she bought things she knew he’d like and apologized to him profusely. She didn’t beat him again, but sometimes the way she chides him seems worse than a whooping.

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

NuNu, with that being said, I hope that your aunt come to the conclusion that beating is not the answer. Especially if you beat and then apologize or reward the child–because said parent feels bad. Not effective at all…

Ty
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So true Nunu…the psychological games and manipulations are worse than a few slaps…remember I do not condone beatings or murderations…

toy7318
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Nile, it makes you feel horrible after hitting your child.

Ty
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It does Nile…

Obara Meji
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I am in and out I am busy lalibela, people where are you all?

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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Attend to your concerns Obara; I know Cami advised that she was going to step away for 45 minutes…

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Toy7318, I do not intend to beat my children. As a parent, I am going to be vigilant in the evaluation of my children and take the requisite measure to ensure that they are in line–everything but beating them. The problem with beating children is that parents are beating children before some of these children even discern that they are doing wrong.

My daughter loves paper, she eat paper ever chance she is able to. Telling her not to eat paper does not provide real time [satisfactory] results and that is not pleasing to me. If she see me coming and she is eating paper, she attempt to hide her action. Usually, I would just take the paper away from her.

However, afterwards I realized that I was dealing with a bigger issue. I was dealing with a child who was developing a means of hiding her activities and I quickly concluded that I have to find a way to correct such. When she see me coming, she would run and nowadays, all that I have to do is ask her for the paper and she would hand it to me. Actually, she’ll take a quick bite and then hand me the paper without me asking. I call that progress…

NuNu
Blogger
NuNu

My baby little cousin doesn’t listen when you speak to him. You could verbally correct him and it would all be in vain, it wasn’t until he got a few swats he’ d listen, so now all you have to do is say no and raise your hand and he’ll immediately stop. He didn’t respond to just “No” so something else had to be done

Ty
Blogger

It is progress Niles

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Ty, that is exactly how I see it. As parents, we have to loop at the big picture–Rome was not built in one day!

Ty
Blogger

Yes Niles….

I follow the second author on twitter…

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

That 2nd author is on MSNBC a lot–he was a voice of reason during the whole Trayvon Martin episode…

Ty
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Yes… He has a new book out…he is bisexual…

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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Ok, then he is gay as I have suspected from the very first time that I observed him–all associated women are just functioning mustaches LOL!

NuNu
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NuNu

Who Ty Dr. Michael Dyson???

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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A few years ago, I almost hit a jaywalking Dr. Dyson!

Ty
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Lol…

He is always hyper…

NuNu
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NuNu

I love his social commentary. He can ruffle a few feathers sometimes lol

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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He is regarded as the Hip Hop professor…

NuNu
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NuNu

Nile He does love to rhyme lol

Ty
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Grung..

Obara Meji
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What ah name fi batty man, blow! Henny how who is de hip hop proffesor mr blow?

Obara Meji
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I will soon be there

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
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No no, Eric Dyson is regard as the Hip Hop professor–Georgetown University….

Ty
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Blow was raped as a child and then had sexual confusion…he now classifies himself as bisexual….

Dyson is the hip hop professor…

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Ty, have you read his book–Charles M. Blow?

Ty
Blogger

I follow him on twitter and so have read excerpts…plus he did a wonderful column on the book recently…the book is called fire in my bones…

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Lawrence O’Donnell is praising Blow’s effort–he regard his book as a literary masterpiece… The NY Times–Blow’s employer–compares Blow’s book to Langston Hughes’ first book…

NuNu
Blogger
NuNu

Wow he got a Langston Hughes comparison, I’m going to google the book to see what it’s about

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Bayard Rustin might be is role model/inspiration…

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

I am sure that you will enjoy that book…

NuNu
Blogger
NuNu

It’s his memoir detailing his child abuse. The title is interesting there is a gospel song with the same title, the fire is a reference to the holy spirit. He said he is bisexual but he is more attracted to women than men, but he knows that men can be attracted to each other

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Greetings MTH!!!

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Imagine this, “Jamaican doctors say they won’t be attending to patients with Ebola because they are not equipped to do so
“We don’t have any money in Jamaica, but if it comes, I don’t know how many of us are going to be willing to come to work. We in ICU are not going to deal with it. I’m not going to expose my doctors and nurses to that,” he continued. “So Accident and Emergency will have to decide what they are going to do with the first one (case).”
“But where will we quarantine them? We don’t even have the equipment,” said another doctor. “[Health Minister] Fenton Ferguson won’t be here to buy them (gear) when Ebola comes here. We are going to hear that he is not on the island,” she added, to snickers from the gathering.
http://jamaica-star.com/thestar/20141002/ent/ent1.html Story…”

Ty
Blogger

Both dr. Fenton and Portia do not live in Ja…

NuNu
Blogger
NuNu

I can’t believe they said that, I really hope it doesn’t get tp that point,, they don’t know how to handle the chick-v muchless ebola.

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

A friend of mine in the medical field down there is telling me that things are a mess. She herself now has the chick-v and ran into seizures earlier today while at work at the KPH…

NuNu
Blogger
NuNu

This thing is so widespread thank goodness it’s not terminal. I really wonder if it’s caused by mosquitos. They need to get organized. Flu like symptoms, rash and now seizures.

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

I am back one and all

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

I will be right back.

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Interesting…

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

I am here waiting to hear what he has to say…

Obara Meji
Blogger

All seizures?

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Obara, yes indeed…

NuNu
Blogger
NuNu

Goodnight Nile, I have to be up early in the morning so I’m off to bed. Goodnight everyone

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Sweet dreams NuNu

NuNu
Blogger
NuNu

I think his book is called Fire Shut up in my Bones

Ty
Blogger

Oops…you are correct Nunu

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

I really don’t understand the title…

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Blow is correct or should I say that I agree with him–relative to the following:

“Use of corporal punishment is linked to negative outcomes for children (e.g., delinquency, antisocial behavior, psychological problems, and alcohol and drug abuse), and may be indicative of ineffective parenting. Research also finds that the number of problem behaviors observed in adolescence is related to the amount of spanking a child receives. The greater the age of the child, the stronger the relationship…”

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

No NuNu, not Dr. Dyson, Charles M. Blow. If you switch to MSNBC, he is going to be on–talking about his life story…

NuNu
Blogger
NuNu

Ok thanks Nile I’ll have to check it out

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Thank you so much Ty; I love your explanation…

toy7318
Blogger

Yes, my sister beat my nephew with a coffee or mug, because he couldn’t grasp a math problem. He had so many coco ‘ s on his poor head she had to keep him home from school.

NuNu
Blogger
NuNu

I don’t agree with that at all coffee mug, high heel boot and iron table foot! A abuse dat!

Cami
Blogger
Cami

I got the wooden spoon, the telephone and the cord, the extension cord and de shoes and belt. Anything with length I use to hold on to and back up to my room so I can get in and slam the door shut.

Ty
Blogger

I agree Nunu…

Psychological damage is worse…cause memba seh wen dem beat u, dem cuss u out too…

Cami
Blogger
Cami

That isn’t an act of discipline that is abuse. Obara Iron leg beating was abuse too.

toy7318
Blogger

Came you was a fiesty little thing. You do held on to the belt. Lol

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Here are a few questions that I should have posted in advance:

My principal query has to do with whether or not you support corporal punishment? If yes, why? If no, why?
Do you support the writers premise?

toy7318
Blogger

Well my belief now is children do not have to be beat for them to obey you. I do think sometimes children can push the envelope, but my view is some what mixed. I do think that sometimes children do need a little slap when they try to test you.

Ty
Blogger

Now what we Jcans murderation, I do not agree with…

Ty
Blogger

I see some a dem Pinckney ya chat to them parents and say to myself, a good beaten will straighten that bad manners and behavour

Ty
Blogger

Well I got beaten as a child…most we’re from my mothers depression and frustration…my dad only hit me once…

Every child is different and beaten does not work for all…

Cami
Blogger
Cami

I got my behind bruk (lol) many times as well, mostly by my mother. Daddy only spanked me once at age 3 for lying.

Times I was deserving of them and other times they weren’t warranted.

toy7318
Blogger

Waving Hi to Ty, Nunu, Nile, Cami,

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Greetings toy7318

NuNu
Blogger
NuNu

Hi Toy

Cami
Blogger
Cami

Good Night Lalibela, Ty, MTH and all present and coming.

***I’ll be on for a while (early leave)

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Greetings Cami

NuNu
Blogger
NuNu

Goodnight folks! Present

Ty
Blogger

Hey Nile

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Greetings Ty

Ty
Blogger

Hey Toy

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

Hello one and all!!!

Ty
Blogger

Present

toy7318
Blogger

I am present

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

59 minutes and counting down!!!

MTH
Blogger

Mr. Nile YW know bout. Him know how fi mek yu think and re-think.

MTH
Blogger

Morning Teach…Hope all is well. I am going to finish reading. I must say thanks again to YW, Niles who all moderated. The interaction was good, inspite it being a very dark topic.

Lalibela A Nile (@Lalibela_Nile)
Blogger

You are welcome MTH; Yw is the real big man on campus–he is on point!

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