October 16, 2011 Obara Meji 1Comment
We all know what glamour means, but it is one of the most difficult things conceivable to find it in ourselves; it is like turning the mind upon itself.  One has read of persons trying to record the impressions made upon them after having used opium; a study in madness, in which the victim portrays the change in consciousness as he began to pass out of the realm of sanity, illustrates this difficulty.  Edgar Allen Poe pictures the same idea in a wonderful manner.   It is so different to set to work on material which is outside the worker, to working on the worker himself.  We use our eyes to see what is around us, what is really outside them; if we could conceive turning the eye on itself —– not another person’s eye —-and subjecting it to a minute anatomical dissection, we should get some notion of the task.  Yet we sharpen a knife by bringing it contact with another, so that though both blades were blunt before being brought together, they are so no longer.
  The glamour of the mind is regarded by some as a wise position of nature to hide some of our deficiencies and shortcomings from ourselves, to soften and assuage the pain which the discovery would awaken, but only the weak now would be content to accept such an anodyne.  Its action, like that of all anodynes is to deaden, to stupefy, to stunt and dwarf, and therefore to lead to involution instead of evolution.  Glamour may be necessary at certain stages in the growth of the ego, but it decidedly is not so when a man begins to take himself in hand, and the man who is anxious to know how to concentrate does not usually rest there:  it is a means to an end and that end is the bringing forth of all the powers latent in man and using them to the fullest extent.
The Old Man of The Sea
Doubt possesses a remarkable degree disquality of glamour; it is like ‘The Old Man of The Sea’.   In one sense; we carry it about on our backs, even when we know we have it, deluding ourselves with the idea that we must always bear the burden.  But a prior stage of excrescence is there, and we know it’s not.  This constitutes the insidiousness of the thing.
We really entertain this mental visitor, this alien (doubt), everyone knows, once a thing is set going one never knows where it will stop.  In fact, once begun a thing acquires a momentum of its own.  When we deal with forces it is not like dealing with dead things.  A stone thrown from the hand will travel until the force which actuated is spent, and it falls to the ground.  It is mechanical; it lacks the life which force possesses, though even a stone has life, only not sufficiently developed to the point we find the case of a vital force.  A force contains the element of self-initiation; that is to say, it has potentialities.  It has, as it were, life behind it so that when we start it off, it has the faculty of going on through its own volition.
 We get this idea of this in the problem of perpetual motion which has exercised the minds of the greatest thinkers in all ages.  We have tried to create some device which, once set going; will continue to move all for eternity.  As a result some clever mechanical apparatus have been invented, things would wind themselves up when they have run down, showing the idea of a something existing in the universe which pulsed primeval life.  It does exist too; the atom is an example of it.  It is a vortex of perpetual force, of movement, which cannot be destroyed, but which may be altered as regards direction.  And this is the practical bearing it has for us.  So long as the mind exists it must work.  True, we can see thinking for brief spaces of time but they are very brief indeed.  Whether we like it or not, the mind will go on functioning and if we do not provide it with work, it will provide work for itself.  In this way doubt will be accepted as something for the mind to put itself against, and doubt bars the way to accomplishment.  To seek to concentrate a mind in which doubt has a state, is like trying to extract the minimum worth and brightness from a fire great which is stroked with ashes and piled up with rubbish as well.
  What avail is the best coal when put on such a fire?  If we give the fire time at all the rubbish will probably be burnt up, but this will require too long a period and we cannot get the best out of our fire whilst it is in this state.  A mind which harbors doubt is a mind that is confused, and this confusion is not always apparent to its possessor.  You can only secure the fullest use of a power by it being unfettered by others; and only by the fullest use by using 100%, do you achieve anything worthwhile.  When forces are divided there is leakage in power, and one force neutralizes another.
The mind is like a bottled up volcano, full of immense forces, only unlike its physical prototype.  It is under lock and key, or under control; the control is unconscious however, just as the mind’s power usually are.  The lid comes off when the mind is unhinged, when there is a want of balance and the most brilliant genius has paid the penalty of not understanding the forces he has created or developed.  If we will control it we must seek to understand it and I have referred to the intent activity of the mind, the fact that it is never still, but always moving like a large crowd, a number of which to go in various directions. (taken from The Master Key by L.W de Laurence)

 

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